Critical Thinking

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Click to edit Master subtitle style 6/13/11 Ch. 2 Two Kinds of Reasoning
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6/13/11 Conclusions as Premises The premise of an argument becomes the conclusion of a new argument when the premise is uncertain or controversial. Ex: Premise: The brakes aren’t working, the engine burns oil, the transmission needs work, and the car is hard to start.
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6/13/11 Unstated Premises and Unstated premises are common because sometimes they appear to be obvious. Unstated conclusions are less common.
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6/13/11 Deductive Inductive Premises prove Premises support
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6/13/11 Validity, Soundness, and A deductive argument is valid if it is not possible for premise to be true and conclusion false. If the premise of a valid argument is true, then the argument is sound. When using an inductive argument, the goal is to support a conclusion.
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6/13/11 “Beyond a Reasonable Doubt” Proof beyond a reasonable doubt
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Unformatted text preview: is the highest standard of the law. This is a lower standard than deductive proof, where there is no room for possible doubt. 6/13/11 Deduction, Induction, and An inductive argument with an unstated premise can easily be turned into a valid, deductive argument by supplying a universal premise: something that holds true in all cases, everywhere, without exception. Context and content sometimes make a speakers unstated premise clear. 6/13/11 Techniques for understanding 1) find the conclusion 2) locate the reasons (premise) offered for conclusion 3) look for reasons (if any were given) for the premise 6/13/11 Evaluating arguments Logic: Does the argument either demonstrate of support its conclusion? Truth: Are the premises actually true? Determining the truth of premises requires: Knowledge...
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This note was uploaded on 06/10/2011 for the course HUM 115 taught by Professor Miller during the Spring '11 term at Craven CC.

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ch2 notes - is the highest standard of the law. This is a...

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