D2Ou - Ou 1 Po-Ting Ou Professor Schamp English 2 Please...

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Ou 1 Po-Ting Ou Professor Schamp English 2 May 16, 2011 Please compare and contrast Shakespeare’s and Howard Moss’ “Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day ? ” So Long As Poems Live Onu Whenever sonnets are mentioned, the name of William sShakespeare (1564---1616) comes to people’s mind right away, not only because he is the greatest poet and playwright, worthy of being admired forever, but he wrote 154 sonnets and created Shakespearean sonnets. His “Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?” is one of the best-known sonnets--- sonnet 18 deserves its fame because it is one of the most beautifully written verses in the English language. As people say, imitation is the sincerest way of flattery : an American poet Howard Moss (1922---1987) saluted Shakespear by writing a poem with the same title in the 20th century. Reading, comparing and contrasting these two poems are really pleasing. Because Moss’s easily-understood poem can help us learn more about sonnet 18, and the parody does serve the purpose of being ironic. I want to analyze the two in three aspects – word choices, figure of speech and rhyme: Firstly, in terms of word choices ,William Shakespeare is elegant, unhurried but sophisticated, while Howard Moss is short, simple and ironic. Shakespear’s answer to the rhetoric question “Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?” is “Thou art more lovely and
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This note was uploaded on 06/10/2011 for the course ENGLISH 1 taught by Professor Meyer during the Spring '11 term at UCSB.

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D2Ou - Ou 1 Po-Ting Ou Professor Schamp English 2 Please...

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