ARM Bus Standards

ARM Bus Standards - ARM BUS Standards Embedded Systems...

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ARM BUS Standards Embedded Systems Assignment 2 Amira Hosny Abbas 5/3/2011
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This assignment contains the answer to the first question regarding bandwidth of PCI and ISA followed by a report on ARM processor bus standards
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1. Compute the peak I/O bandwidth of a 16-bit ISA bus that takes 6 cycles of a 8 Mhz clock per transfer, and compare it to a 32-bit PCI bus with a 66 Mhz clock doing a PCI burst of four data values with 2-1-1-1 clock cycles on the burst. Answer Bandwidth = width (no. of bits) *No. of cycles * frequency For ISA: 16*6*8M = 768Mbits/sec=96Mbyte/sec For PCI: (2+1+1+1)*66*32 = 10560Mbit/sec=1320Mbyte/sec
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ARM processor Standards Introduction Embedded systems use different bus technologies than those designed for x86 PCs. The most common PC bus technology, the Peripheral Component Interconnect (PCI) bus, connects such devices as video cards and hard disk controllers to the x 86 processor buses. This type of technology is external or off-chip (i.e., the bus is designed to connect mechanically and electrically to devices external to the chip) and is built into the motherboard of a PC. In contrast, embedded devices use an on-chip bus that is internal to the chip and that allows different peripheral devices to be interconnected with an ARM core. There are two different classes of devices attached to the bus. The ARM processor core is a bus master —a logical device capable of initiating a data transfer with another device across the same bus. Peripherals tend to be bus slaves —logical devices capable only of responding to a transfer request from a bus master device. A bus has two architecture levels. The first is a physical level that covers the electrical characteristics and bus width (16, 32, 64 or 128 bits). The second level deals with protocol —the logical rules that govern the communication between the processor and a peripheral. AMBA The Advanced Microprocessor Bus Architecture (AMBA) defined by ARM is a widely used open standard for an on-chip bus system. This standard aims to ease the component design, by allowing the combination of interchangeable components in the SoC design. It promotes the reuse of intellectual property components, so that at least a part of the SoC design can become a
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ARM Bus Standards - ARM BUS Standards Embedded Systems...

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