Chapter 21

Chapter 21 - Chapter21 TheTheoryofConsumerChoice 21...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 21 The Theory of Consumer Choice SOLUTIONS TO TEXT PROBLEMS: Quick Quizzes Figure 1 1. A person with an income of $1,000 could purchase $1,000/$5 = 200 pints of Pepsi if she spent all  of her income on Pepsi or she could purchase $1,000/$10 = 100 pizzas if she spent all of her  income on pizza.  Thus the point representing 200 pints of Pepsi and no pizzas is the vertical  intercept and the point representing 100 pizzas and no Pepsi is the horizontal intercept of the  budget constraint, as shown in Figure 1.  The slope of the budget constraint is the rise over the  run, or -200/100 = -2.   2. Figure 2 shows indifference curves between Pepsi and pizza.  The four properties of these  indifference curves are:  (1) higher indifference curves are preferred to lower ones because  consumers prefer more of a good to less of it; (2) indifference curves are downward sloping  because if the quantity of one good is reduced, the quantity of the other good must increase in  order for the consumer to be equally happy; (3) indifference curves do not cross because if they  139 THE THEORY OF  CONSUMER CHOICE 21
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
140   Chapter 21/The Theory of Consumer Choice did, the assumption that more is preferred to less would be violated; and (4) indifference curves  are bowed inward because people are more willing to trade away goods that they have in  abundance and less willing to trade away goods of which they have little. Figure 2 3. Figure 3 shows the budget constraint ( BC 1 ) and two indifference curves.  The consumer is initially  at point A, where the budget constraint is tangent to an indifference curve.  The increase in the  price of pizza shifts the budget constraint to  BC 2 , and the consumer moves to point C where the  new budget constraint is tangent to a lower indifference curve.  To break this move down into  income and substitution effects requires drawing the dashed budget line shown, which is parallel  to the new budget constraint and tangent to the original indifference curve at point B.  The  movement from A to B represents the substitution effect, while the movement from B to C  represents the income effect.
Background image of page 2
 141 Figure 3 4. An increase in the wage can potentially decrease the amount that a person wants to work  because a higher wage has an income effect that increases both leisure and consumption and a  substitution effect that increases consumption and decreases leisure.  Since less leisure means  more work, a person will work more only if the substitution effect outweighs the income effect. Questions for Review
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 16

Chapter 21 - Chapter21 TheTheoryofConsumerChoice 21...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online