Chapter 7 - Chapter7...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 7 SOLUTIONS TO TEXT PROBLEMS: Quick Quizzes 1. Figure 1 shows the demand curve for turkey.  The price of turkey is  P 1  and the consumer surplus  that results from that price is denoted CS.  Consumer surplus measures buyers’ willingness to  pay (measured by the demand curve) minus the amount the buyers actually pay. Figure 1 131 7 CONSUMERS, PRODUCERS, AND  EFFICIENCY OF MARKETS
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
132   Chapter 7/Consumers, Producers, and Efficiency of Markets Figure 2 2. Figure 2 shows the supply curve for turkey.  The price of turkey is  P 1  and the producer surplus  that results from that price is denoted PS.  Producer surplus measures the amount sellers are  paid for a good minus the sellers’ cost (measured by the supply curve). Figure 3 3. Figure 3 shows the supply and demand for turkey.  The price of turkey is  P 1 , consumer surplus is  CS, and producer surplus is PS.  Producing more turkey would lower total surplus because the  value to buyers would be less than the cost to sellers.
Background image of page 2
Chapter 7/Consumers, Producers, and Efficiency of Markets   133 Questions for Review 1. Buyers' willingness to pay, consumer surplus, and the demand curve are all closely related.  The  height of the demand curve represents the willingness to pay of the buyers.  Consumer surplus is  the area below the demand curve and above the price, which equals each buyer's willingness to  pay less the price of the good. 2. Sellers' costs, producer surplus, and the supply curve are all closely related.  The height of the  supply curve represents the costs of the sellers.  Producer surplus is the area below the price and  above the supply curve, which equals the price minus each sellers' costs. Figure 4 3. Figure 4 shows producer and consumer surplus in a supply-and-demand diagram. 4. An allocation of resources is efficient if it maximizes total surplus, the sum of consumer surplus  and producer surplus.  But efficiency may not be the only goal of economic policymakers; they  may also be concerned about equity the fairness of the distribution of well-being. 5. The invisible hand of the marketplace guides the self-interest of buyers and sellers into promoting  general economic well-being.  Despite decentralized decisionmaking and self-interested  decisionmakers, free markets lead to an efficient outcome. 6. Two types of market failure are market power and externalities.  Market power may cause market  outcomes to be inefficient because when firms influence prices they cause price and quantity to  differ from the levels they would be under perfect competition, which keeps total surplus from 
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
134 
Background image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 06/11/2011 for the course ECON 101 taught by Professor Lemche during the Winter '05 term at The University of British Columbia.

Page1 / 16

Chapter 7 - Chapter7...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 5. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online