Lesson 4 - Lesson 4 The Greek and the Roman approaches to...

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Lesson 4 The Greek and the Roman approaches to translation The Greeks were somewhat ethnocentric; they minimized the value of anything not written in Greek. One measure of this is the word “barbarian” (meaning “nonsense” or “incomprehensible”) which the Greeks used to describe the languages of other nations. However the great classical Greek writers knew the value of translation and commented on it; Cicero, for example, stated that a word for word translation would sound uncouth, while if he departed too much from the order or wording of the original he would not be a good translator. The great roman enthusiasm for translation, especially from Greek, was the result of the pragmatic Roman attitude toward the other Mediterranean cultures: if it enriched Roman culture, then it would be adopted an adapted. At the same time the Romans appreciated the value of Latin, the typical educated Roman citizen was bilingual or trilingual. Translations of literature were difficult because the typical reader
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This note was uploaded on 06/12/2011 for the course LENGUAS 131 taught by Professor Mm during the Spring '11 term at UNAM MX.

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Lesson 4 - Lesson 4 The Greek and the Roman approaches to...

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