CB WK 4 - Consumer Perception

CB WK 4 - Consumer Perception - Consumer Behaviour Consumer...

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Consumer Behaviour Consumer Perception
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Learning Objectives 1. To Understand the Sensory Dynamics of Perception. 2. To Learn About the Three Elements of Perception. 3. To Understand the Components of Consumer Imagery and Their Strategic Applications.
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Perception The process by which an individual selects, organizes, and interprets stimuli into a meaningful and coherent picture of the world Elements of Perception Sensation Absolute threshold Differential threshold Subliminal perception
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Sensation and Sensory Thresholds Sensation is the immediate and direct response of the sensory organs to stimuli A stimulus is any unit of input to any of the senses. The absolute threshold is the lowest level at which an individual can experience a sensation. e.g dog whistle is too high to be detected by human ears. This stimulus is beyond our auditory threshold.
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Differential Threshold (Just Noticeable Difference – j.n.d.) •It is the ability of a sensory system to detect changes or differences between two stimuli. Weber’s law The j.n.d. between two stimuli is not an absolute amount but an amount relative to the intensity of the first stimulus The stronger the initial stimulus, the greater the additional intensity needed for the second stimulus to be perceived as different.
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Marketing Applications of the J.N.D. Marketers need to determine the relevant j.n.d. for their products so that negative changes are not readily discernible to the public so that product improvements are very apparent to consumers
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Subliminal Perception Stimuli that are too weak or too brief to be consciously seen or heard They may be strong enough to be perceived by one or more receptor cells. Is it effective? Extensive research has shown no evidence that subliminal advertising can cause behavior changes Some evidence that subliminal stimuli may influence affective reactions e.g urge to buy popcorn and coke during a movie. Run to get them and then realise 'why did I do that?'
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3 stages of Perception process Selection or Exposure Attention or Organisation Interpretation
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1. Perceptual Selection • Includes the product’s physical attributes,
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This note was uploaded on 06/12/2011 for the course MM 101 taught by Professor Brunos during the Spring '11 term at London Business School.

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CB WK 4 - Consumer Perception - Consumer Behaviour Consumer...

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