1031 EXCHANGE - Like-Kind Exchanges FROM IRS PUB 544 The...

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Unformatted text preview: Like-Kind Exchanges FROM IRS PUB 544 The exchange of property for the same kind of property is the most common type of nontaxable exchange. To be a like-kind exchange, the property traded and the property received must be both of the fol owing. Qualifying property. Like-kind property. These two requirements are discussed later. Additional requirements apply to exchanges in which the property received is not received immediately upon the transfer of the property given up. See Deferred Exchange, later. If the like-kind exchange involves the receipt of money or unlike property or the assumption of your liabilities, you may have to recognize gain. See Partialy Nontaxable Exchanges, later. Multiple-party transactions. The like-kind exchange rules also apply to property exchanges that involve three- and four-party transactions. Any part of these multiple-party transactions can qualify as a like-kind exchange if it meets al the requirements described in this section. Receipt of title from third party. If you receive property in a like-kind exchange and the other party who transfers the property to you does not give you the title, but a third party does, you stil can treat this transaction as a like-kind exchange if it meets al the requirements. Basis of property received. If you acquire property in a like-kind exchange, the basis of that property is the same as the basis of the property you transferred. For the basis of property received in an exchange that is only partial y nontaxable, see Partialy Nontaxable Exchanges, later. Example. You exchanged real estate held for investment with an adjusted basis of $25,000 for other real estate held for investment. The fair market value of both properties is $50,000. The basis of your new property is the same as the basis of the old ($25,000). Money paid. If, in addition to giving up like-kind property, you pay money in a like-kind exchange, you stil have no recognized gain or loss. The basis of the property received is the basis of the property given up, increased by the money paid. Example. Bil Smith trades an old cab for a new one. The new cab costs $30,000. He is al owed $8,000 for the old cab and pays $22,000 cash. He has no recognized gain or loss on the transaction regardless of the adjusted basis of his old cab. If Bil sold the old cab to a third party for $8,000 and bought a new one, he would have a recognized gain or loss on the sale of his old cab equal to the difference between the amount realized and the adjusted basis of the old cab. Sale and purchase. If you sel property and buy similar property in two mutual y dependent transactions, you may have to treat the sale and purchase as a single nontaxable exchange....
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This note was uploaded on 06/12/2011 for the course TAX 553 taught by Professor Bruce during the Spring '11 term at Keller Graduate School of Management.

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1031 EXCHANGE - Like-Kind Exchanges FROM IRS PUB 544 The...

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