UofP - MBA560 - Business and Workplace Ethics - 06-10-06

UofP - MBA560 - Business and Workplace Ethics - 06-10-06 -...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Unit 1 Unit 1: Introduction to Business Ethics UNIVERSITY OF ST ANDREWS Scotland’s First University CENTRE FOR BUSINESS EDUCATION 1
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Unit 1 Learning Objectives On completing this unit you should be able to: 1. Understand the social and moral issues facing business managers today. 2. Appreciate the need to utilise ethical repertoires in identifying and solving ethical dilemmas. Introduction This module tackles an area of growing concern in society and academia, that of the impact of commercialisation on society. Business managers are held responsible for a great many corporate activities which are deemed unreasonable, dishonest, irresponsible, damaging and harmful across many markets and in both public and private sectors. This criticism of business requires further scrutiny in terms of the market contexts in which business takes place, the philosophical perspectives on business activity and the detailed analysis of business actions across the various functional activities. Workbook 1 considers the moral philosophical perspectives on business and markets while workbook 2 looks more specifically at the business functions themselves. CENTRE FOR BUSINESS EDUCATION 2 Course Notes
Background image of page 2
Unit 1 1. Why business ethics is necessary Business Ethics is essential for business. Business ethics is vital not because it is fashionable – though business can ill afford to ignore anything, however silly, that seriously influences the markets in which it operates. Rather, business ethics is necessary because ethical choices are unavoidable. The business ethics challenge is to make that inevitable ethical decision-making explicit so as to make it better. Far from being anti-business, business ethics actually provides essential support for maximising long-term owner value. 2. The pervasiveness of ethical considerations Business ethics is commonly associated in the media with environmental disasters and financial scandals, with bribery and sexual harassment and competitive “dirty tricks”. But though such transgressions demand attention, they nevertheless do not constitute the whole or even the main part of business ethics. Contrary to popular belief, ethical issues can arise in respect of any and all business activities. As a result, the need to consider business ethics is not an optional extra, but a central, inescapable fact of business life. Ethical concerns permeate every aspect of business activity, because ethical concerns permeate all human activity. Ethical issues obviously arise in connection with core ethical values: when there are questions of, for example, honesty or justice. They are also potentially at issue whenever actions or decisions affect other people, either by helping or by harming them. But ethical issues can even arise when other people’s rights and interests are not directly at stake. Whenever there is a choice to be made
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 06/12/2011 for the course ETHICS mba taught by Professor Wilkes during the Spring '05 term at University of Phoenix.

Page1 / 96

UofP - MBA560 - Business and Workplace Ethics - 06-10-06 -...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online