UofP - MBA580 - Individual Assignment - Week Five - Simulations - 09-30-06

UofP - MBA580 - Individual Assignment - Week Five - Simulations - 09-30-06

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Simulations Reflection 1 Simulations Reflection: “Thinking Strategically,” “Developing Grand Strategies,” and “Creating a Strategic Roadmap” Robert Sikes, MBA580 University of Phoenix September 30, 2006
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Simulations Reflection 2 Abstract Three simulations regarding strategic thinking, developing grand strategies, and creating a strategic roadmap will be analyzed applying the following criterion: (1) the importance and effectiveness of environmental scanning, (2) strategy formulation and choice, (3) formulation of action plans and goals, (4) developing a strategic plan using concepts and analytic tools, and (5) challenges facing strategic planners. This summary analysis will discuss lessons learned and concepts applied in the final development of a strategic plan for Stewart Title Company.
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Simulations Reflection 3 Simulations Reflection: “Thinking Strategically,” “Developing Grand Strategies,” and “Creating a Strategic Roadmap” Importance and Effectiveness of Environmental Scanning All three simulations contained elements of external factors impacting three simulated organizations: BJ’s ProSports, Oz!, and ConstructWell. The remote, industry, and operating environments are interrelated subcategories of the external environment (Pearce and Robinson, 2005, p. 78). Strategic flexibility is closely linked to environmental uncertainty. As the external environment becomes more volatile, Stewart Title Company (Stewart) will need to develop greater flexibility in order to respond to the emerging conditions. According to Evans (1991) flexibility is composed of a number of “senses” including “adaptability, agility, corrigibility, elasticity, hedging, liquidity, malleability, plasticity, resilience, robustness, and versatility”. Lessons Learned/Concepts Applied By performing a SWOT analysis, Stewart will be able to diagram strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats. However, by performing a Matched Pair Analysis, Stewart will be able to expand the scope of the basic SWOT Analysis and enable the generation of more alternative strategic choices (University, 2006). The Matched Pair analysis matrix uses six matches complementing the core SWOT analysis: 1. Opportunities/Threats 2. Strengths/Weaknesses 3. Strengths/Opportunities/Threats 4. Opportunities/Strengths/Weaknesses 5. Threats/Strengths/Weaknesses 6. Strengths/Weaknesses/Opportunities/Threats (core “SWOT” components).
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Simulations Reflection 4 The purchase of a Matched Pair Analysis would be to offer managers at Stewart all
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UofP - MBA580 - Individual Assignment - Week Five - Simulations - 09-30-06

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