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Movement Perspective - Movement Perspective Foundational...

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Movement Perspective Foundational Objectives Students will: Demonstrate competency in many physical activities and proficiency in a few physical activities. Apply movement concepts and principles to the learning and development of movement patterns and skills. The Movement Perspective distinguishes Physical Education from other curricula. It is the vehicle that enables the Active Living and Personal-Social-Cultural perspectives to be actualized. The Basic Movement Patterns, variables, principles and strategies are the organizers for instruction. Basic Movement Patterns The Basic Movement Patterns are building blocks. Once they are learned they can be combined to become the more complex skills used in settings such as those found in sports, games, dance and gymnastics. Basic Movement Patterns Movement Skills Sending Throwing Striking Receiving Catching Collecting Accompanying Dribbling Carrying Evading Dodging
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Faking Screening Locomotions Displacement of the body from one place to another Landings On feet On hands While rotating Statics Balances Supports Hangs Swings From supports From hangs Rotations About the axes of the body Longitudinal Medial Lateral Springs From the arms From the legs The Basic Movement Patterns are generic in the sense that they are not limited to any single sport or activity. For example, Rotation movement skills and understanding of the concept Rotation can be developed in and through a variety of Educational Gymnastics activities, in and through a variety of Educational Games activities, in and through Rhythmic and Dance, Alternative Environment and Individual and Dual activities. Most sports and activities are made up of combinations of Basic Movement Patterns. The game of softball, for example, comprises primarily Sending, Receiving and Locomotions. The game of basketball is made up of Sending, Receiving, Accompanying (a teammate or the ball), Evading (opposing team players) and Locomotions (running). Gymnastics activities consist of a variety of Locomotions, Landings, Statics, Rotations, Swings and Springs.
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What changes from one sport or activity to another is: The way the movement patterns are used or performed. (e.g., Sending—throwing or striking—may be performed with different parts of the body, using different body actions, while in different body shapes, while at a low/medium/high level, using a large/small action, rapidly/slowly, standing near to/far away from a partner, teammates, individually, using different implements—scoops, bats, racquets, sticks). The context in which the movement pattern is used or performed (e.g., Sending may be performed within the context of a modified soccer game or in a rhythmics and dance setting). The environment in which the movement pattern is used or performed (e.g., Sending may be learned and performed in an aquatic environment, an out-of-door environment, a classroom environment, a home environment).
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