Argument Essay - citing sources

Argument Essay - citing sources - Welcome to Using Sources...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
1 Welcome to Using Sources in Your Essay z Essay – a paper you write for this class An essay or paper A personal writing A report A research paper z We’ll cover— How outside sources lend credibility to your paper Tips on citing sources Tips on adding quotes to your paper What to avoid in quoting sources This lecture gives you some basic pointers about using outside resources in your essays. Let’s use “essay” to mean any paper you write for this class, including an essay, a personal writing, a report, or a research paper in which you are asked to use outside resources to lend credibility to statements, or claims, that you make in the paper. You’ll also get some tips on what to avoid when using resources, such as exact phrasing when you’re doing a paraphrase. It might be helpful to have a piece of paper handy (or an electronic notepad) to jot down notes and questions as they occur. This presentation will also be available on the WebCT for this class. The lecture should take 20-30 minutes.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
2 Why Citations Have to be Legal z Copyright law z In-text citation: giving credit to the author of source material that appears in your essay Example: Dorothea Krook suggests that "an objective moral order which at once incorporates the human and transcends it" is affirmed in the greatest tragedies (15). “Works Cited” page also gives authors credit Powerful copyright laws protect an author’s published works, and college professors care a great deal about honesty and integrity in the use of others’ research material. At the same time, teachers want students to consult outside sources to give their essays credibility and interest. When you cite a source in the text of your essay, you are giving credit to the author of the original material you are using. In fact, you must give credit to the original author, as the example shows, or be considered a plagiarist, a thief of published ideas. The author of the original source, Dorothea Krook, is given credit for her work by the appearance of her name, quotes around what she argues, and the page number where the original material appeared. Krook will be given more complete credit in a final page of the essay where all “works cited” in the essay appear. This is the standard by which most professional papers are written, and college papers follow this style too. Source material can be paraphrased, summarized, or quoted. The differences between these techniques will be discussed later.
Background image of page 2
3 Appealing to Authority z Appealing to authority Means using the comments & insights of experts (source material) Demonstrates that experts discuss your ideas This “evidence” adds validity to your argument z Heart of the paper should be your ideas Source material supports your ideas z Don’t allow source material to take over Source material should comprise 20-30% of your paper Appealing to Authority Support your interpretation or argument by "appealing to authority," that is,
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 06/12/2011 for the course A 100 taught by Professor Louellanelson during the Spring '11 term at Orange Coast College.

Page1 / 19

Argument Essay - citing sources - Welcome to Using Sources...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online