{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

U07 Status_Student - StatusProcesses StatusProcesses...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–7. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Status Processes Status Processes Sociology 320 Fall 2009
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
2 Overview Overview Background on Status in Groups What is Status Generalization Traditional Explanations  Status Characteristics Theory Status Interventions Status Outside the Scope
Background image of page 2
3 Background Studies Background Studies Began in 1950s during heyday of conformity research  Early gender studies employed adjective checklist methods         (G1: identify + or -)  (G2: identify m or f) Both men and women see men as having more positive adjectives Men are seen as mathematical, scientific, skilled in business affairs Females seen as literary, artistic, skilled at domestic affairs Behavioral Research    M interrupt women, but not the reverse.   Article importance is related to gender of author   Females yield to M influence more than the reverse    (Even females with dominant personalities)
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
4 Background Studies Background Studies Katz & Braly (1933) Princeton race studies What traits are possessed by whites, blacks, jews, etc.  For whites: industrious, intelligent, ambitious, progressive For backs: lazy, superstitious, ignorant, musical Similar stereotypes found in studies through 1980s Behavioral research: whites initiate more interaction & are  evaluated more positively than black kids Black kids perform better for black testers Teachers attribute white success internally / black success externally
Background image of page 4
5 Background Studies Background Studies Physical Attraction Attractive people rated as more confident happy perceptive Adjective checklist methods (same results) Performances of attractive people evaluated more positively Occupational Prestige Higher status occupations have more jury influence Higher status occupations overly represented as foreperson Adjective checklist methods (same results)
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
6 Status Generalization Status Generalization Individual characteristics (race, gender, age) differentiate  members of a society These traits are culturally valued – for any given culture there is a general  consensus regarding which traits are more positive The cultural value of the trait is generalized to new situations –  high status outside a group leads to high status inside a group These characteristics produce cognitive and behavioral inequalities (i.e.,  opportunities to participate, actual participation, evaluations, influence over  others, termed OPPO) Status generalization is an unconscious process used to structure ambiguous situations A characteristic need not be relevant to have an effect.  Thus, low status  members (less educated, women, blacks) are treated as inferior even when  education, gender and race are unrelated to the task
Background image of page 6
Image of page 7
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}