The Corsair - Byrons T he Corsair (1814) Organized by three...

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Byron’s The Corsair (1814) Organized by three cantos; written in heroic couplets (rhymed, iambic pentameter) Canto I o Begins with a song, of sorts, sung by the Corsair’s men – “And unto ears as rugged seem’d a song!” (l. 46); o The Corsair – Conrad – introduced in second section, l. 61: He is “famed and fear’d”; he does not mingle with his men – except to command; nor does he drink; he stands apart and “shuns the grosser joys of sense” and his mind is the stronger for it; o A ship returns – without spoil but with news of a strike on Conrad’s retreat: Conrad will leave that very night to strike preemptively; o Section XI: an account of Conrad’s turn to villainy: And his love, scarcely mortal (l. 304); o Section XIII: Conrad senses that this trip might spell the end (he’ll still go, of course); o Section XIV: Medora: Conrad’s love for her is intimately connected to his hatred of mankind (see l. 405);
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o Canto I ends with Conrad departing to attack the Pacha
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This note was uploaded on 06/15/2011 for the course ENG 283 taught by Professor Bennion during the Spring '10 term at South Carolina.

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The Corsair - Byrons T he Corsair (1814) Organized by three...

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