checkpoint

checkpoint - Part 1 1. The typical U.S. household (4.8...

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Part 1 1. The typical U.S. household (4.8 people) was almost twice as large in 1900 as it is today (2.6 people). 2. A social movement- an organized activity that encourages or discourages social change. 3. Alterative social movements are the least threatening to the status quo because they seek limited change in only part of the population. 4. Reformative social movements aim for only limited change but target everyone. 5. Revolutionary social movements are the most extreme of all, striving for major transformation of an entire society. Part 2 Social change is any change that may occur in mature, social institutions, social behaviors, or social relations of a society. Some ways that social change occurs is by using a direct action, protesting, community organizations, and political activism. Some features of social change is that it can be an unexpected incident, it could be notorious, it can happen fast or slow, the bottom line is that social change is always happening and it never stops. Four examples of social movements are alternative social movements, reformative social movements,
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This note was uploaded on 06/13/2011 for the course ACC 320 taught by Professor Tittle during the Spring '10 term at Temple.

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