exam 3 review - Review Click to edit Master subtitle style...

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Click to edit Master subtitle style 6/15/11 Review
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6/15/11 Pontifical Academy (P1) All persons have the right to be self-determining. (autonomy) (P2) P1 implies that all persons have a right to life. (P3) Embryos are human subjects, or persons. Subconclusion: Therefore, embryos
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6/15/11 Michael Sandel (P1) That action should be selected that leads to the greatest good for the greatest number. (utility) (P2) One should always act in ways that promote the welfare of others. (beneficence) (P3) In the case of therapeutic cloning of embryonic stem cells, that action that will lead to the greatest good for the greatest number and promote the overall
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6/15/11 Kass Three Perspectives on Cloning Technological perspective – cloning is viewed as an extension of existing techniques for existing reproduction and determining genetic make-up of potential children; morality of cloning depends on the goodness or badness of the motives and intentions of the persons doing the cloning. Liberal perspective – cloning is another right among others, just a new option of exercising
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6/15/11 P1. ) All human beings have the right to be self- determining. (principle of autonomy)
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6/15/11 P2.D.) Cloning may confound social identity of individuals. Currently in place social barriers with respect to family roles would be altered, such that a parent could be considered a sister or a brother to the clone, and it will be difficult to determine the responsibility of other persons to the clone. [e.g., if child is cloned from mother, then are the relatives on the father’s side related to the child, or do they have any obligations to the child?] P2.E.) Cloning will turn procreation into the manufacturing of individuals. Human children will be artifacts or byproducts of manufacturing. P2.F.) Cloning would enshrine and aggravate a profound misunderstanding of the meaning of having children and the parent-child relationship. Procreation necessarily involves a loosening of human control over reproduction; what we produce is not our property, but new individual life. Cloning would lead to an even greater exertion on the part of parents to control the
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6/15/11 P2.G.) The “right to reproduce” is, at first blush, a statement about individual freedom or the negative claim right to control reproduction. If understood as a positive claim right to control reproduction by any available means, without interference from the state, and meant broadly to include reproductive technology such as cloning as one available means, it could potentially lead down a slippery slope. P2G.A.) However, the “right to reproduce” does
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This note was uploaded on 06/15/2011 for the course PHL 116 taught by Professor Sullivan during the Fall '09 term at University of Alabama at Birmingham.

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exam 3 review - Review Click to edit Master subtitle style...

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