Lecture 3 moral principles

Lecture 3 moral principles - PHL116 Moral principles I....

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PHL116 Moral principles I. Four Moral Principles Moral principles specify guidelines for action. In 1977, the philosophers Beauchamp and Childress identified the four principles as comprising the cornerstone of modern bioethics: nonmalificence, beneficence, justice, and autonomy . 1.) The Principle of Nonmaleficence – All persons ought to act in ways that avoid causing needless harm or injury to others. [“Above all, do no harm” – Hippocrates] Examples of applications of this principle in bioethics : Physicians must exercise due care and live up to the standards of due care, [e.g., they must provide their patients with treatment options, they must possess knowledge and skills relevant to the duties they perform, not subjecting patients to needless risk.] Specific licensing laws in place to ensure practitioners have acquired minimum level of knowledge, skill and experience to perform certain procedures. However, some treatments do harm a patient before the patient’s condition improves: various treatments for cancer. In such cases risk should be minimized. 2.) The Principle of Beneficence – All persons ought to act in ways that promote the welfare of others. [Hippocratic Oath] Examples of applications of this principle in bioethics : A doctor should always act in the best
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Lecture 3 moral principles - PHL116 Moral principles I....

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