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Atoms for Peace_1 - Atoms for Peace Date December 8 1953...

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“Atoms for Peace” Date: December 8, 1953 Speaker: Dwight D. Eisenhower, 34 th U.S. President Primary Audience: the 470 th Plenary Meeting of the United Nations General Assembly Location: New York City, U. N. Headquarters
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Rhetorical Situation Timeline 1945: July 16 – U. S. secretly detonates world’s first atomic bomb July 25 – Truman informs Stalin of US’s new nuclear capabilities August 2 – Potsdam Conference divides Berlin into 4 zones August 6 – Truman authorizes the bombing of Hiroshima August 9 – Truman authorizes bombing of Nagasaki September 2 – Japanese surrender unconditionally to General Douglas MacArthur September 5 – The Guozenko Affair provides proof of a Soviet spy-ring in Canada October 24 – United Nations officially established upon Charter ratification by five permanent members of the Security Council: France, Republic of China, Soviet Union, United Kingdom and the United States
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1946: March 5 – Winston Churchill’s “Sinews of Peace” warns of an “Iron Curtain” descending between W. Europe and the Eastern Bloc See “Sinews of Peace” on YouTube 1947: March 12 – Truman announces “The Truman Doctrine” which outlines a policy of “containment” to stem the spread of Communism June 5 – SoS George Marshall outlines a program of economic assistance for war-torn countries known as “The Marshall Plan” 1948: February 26 – A violent and brutal Communist takeover of Czechoslovakia shocks the West, winning further support for the Truman Doctrine April 3 – Truman signs Marshall Plan into effect June 24 – Joseph Stalin begins the blockade of Berlin and U.S. responds with Airlift
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1949: April 4 – NATO is est. by Belgium, Canada, Denmark, France, Iceland, Italy, Luxemburg, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, the U.K., and the U.S. to fight spread of Communism May 11 – Stalin ends blockade of Berlin August 29 – Soviet Union tests its first a-bomb to become world’s 2 nd nuclear power October 1 – Mao Zedong declares the People’s Republic of China, effectively rendering a fourth of the world’s population Communist 1950: February 14 – Pledge of Mutual Defense signed by U.S.S.R. and People’s Rep. China June 25 – Korean War begins with N. Korea’s invasion of S. Korea June 27 – U.N. votes to send military aid to South Korea October 19 – N. Korean capital Pyongyang falls to U. N. forces 1952: June 30 – Marshall Plan ends October 2 – U. K. becomes world’s 3 rd nuclear power with Operation Hurricane November 1 – U. S. detonates first hydrogen bomb during Operation Ivy
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1953: January 20 – Dwight D. Eisenhower sworn in as 34 th President of U.S.A. March 5 – Death of Joseph Stalin sparks struggle for succession July 27 – A ceasefire ends fighting on Korean Peninsula September 7 – Nikita Khrushchev becomes Soviet Communist Leader December 4-8 – Bermuda Conference – U.S., U.K., and France (Eisenhower, Churchill, and Joseph Laniel) meet to discuss “problems that beset [their] world” December 8 – Eisenhower delivers “Atoms for Peace” to U. N. General Assembly
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