OteroJavierCriticalEvaluationEssay.docx - Otero 1 Javier...

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Otero 1 Javier Otero Professor Rosalie Yezbick English 102 21 January 2018 The Power of Words: A Compelling Speech to Congress on Women’s Suffrage By Carrie Chapman Catt Why were women excluded from voting? The originators of the Constitution and those that succeeded them over the next century thought that women were immature and lacked the ability to think independently or vote prudently. By the beginning of the 1840s, women started voicing their opinions about their right to vote. During the 1880s women’s suffrage took a giant leap forward when activist Carrie Chapman Catt, a former teacher and superintendent in Iowa joined the cause. She was the president of the National Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA) in 1900-1904, and 1915-1920. Catt furthered the movement with organized campaigns, a strong volunteer force, and powerful speeches. She founded the League of Women Voters and was the primary reason for the victory on woman’s suffrage in 1920. Carrie Chapman Catt’s “Address to Congress on Women’s Suffrage” on November 4, 1917 is compelling and affirms her argument that Women’s suffrage is inevitable. Catt uses an antanagoge strategy to deliver her message effectively. Carrie Chapman Catt starts of her speech by using pathos and logos when discussing Americas history. She argues that “Women suffrage is inevitable” (Carrie Catt). She emphasizes that “Suffragists knew it before November 4, 1917; opponent’s afterword” (Catt). She outlines
Otero 2 three clear-cut causes that made it unavoidable. She uses pathos to depict the early history of our

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