Psych_115_-_Somatosensory

Psych_115_-_Somatosensory - PSYCH 115: PRINCIPLES OF...

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PSYCH 115: PRINCIPLES OF BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE Somatosensory systems Apr 28 ‘11
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Specification of Odorant Receptors All the olfactory receptor cells that are sensitive to a particular odorant send their inputs to a particular glomerulus Therefore, in the olfactory bulb, odorant information is already becoming segregated into separate processing units
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Olfactory Inputs to Brain (No Thalamus!)
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IMPORTANT PRINCIPLE! Topographic organization of information in the nervous system
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Taste System Nerve fibers carry information from the taste cells into the brain. Three separate cranial nerves carry information into nuclei in the brainstem. These brainstem neurons then project up to the thalamus (ventral posterior medial nucleus) These neurons send their axons up to the “gustatory” part of the post-central gyrus
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Sensation The somatosensory system has a completely different problem than the chemical detection systems It needs to transduce changes in mechanical stimulation of the skin and/or changes in temperature into neural impulses….
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Sensory Structures Free nerve endings Merkel’s disc Meissner’s corpuscle Hair follicle receptor Pacinian corpuscle Ruffini’s ending Each contribute something unique to the complex aspects of touch sensation.
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Modalities of Somatosensation Vibration Touch (pressure) Touch (stretch) Pain Temperature
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Receptive Field The set of stimuli that are sufficient to set off any particular sensory receptor make up the receptor’s “receptive field” For example, for a taste cell that is depolarized by Na+, we would say its receptive field includes salty flavors applied to the area of the tongue that it “monitors” Receptive fields include: 1) the space being monitored by the receptor and 2) the particular type of stimuli it is sensitive to…
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Vibration Regular vibrations of the skin are detected by
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This note was uploaded on 06/13/2011 for the course PSYCH 115 taught by Professor Shaine during the Spring '07 term at UCLA.

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Psych_115_-_Somatosensory - PSYCH 115: PRINCIPLES OF...

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