Psych_115_-_Vision

Psych_115_-_Vision - PRINCIPLES OF BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE...

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PRINCIPLES OF BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE Vision May 5, 2011
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Visual System In a bright world, light is reflected off of the objects around you, and a subset of that light makes its way into your eye and collides with your retina The visual system provides information about the form, color, location, movement, and identity of objects that are reflecting light onto your retina Therefore, this system transduces light stimuli into a neural code
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Analogy Digital camera Light enters a lens Projected onto an array of photodecetors More photodetectors: a “finer” picture” Each photodecetor processes Amount of light (photons) striking it Brightness Wavelength of photons striking it Color
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Characteristics of “Visual Stimuli” Any particular “pixel” Brightness (number of photons per unit space) Color (wavelength of photons) Extracted from comparing across nearby “pixels” Edges Motion Form
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Optical Features of the Eye The eye has camera- like features: The cornea and lens focus light Refraction – the bending of light – is done by the cornea and forms the image Ciliary muscles in the eye adjust the focus, by changing the shape of the lens The process of focusing the lens is called accommodation Light entering the eye is controlled by the pupil , an opening in the iris Eye movement is controlled by extraocular muscles
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Gross Features of the Eye
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Visual Fields Right eye: right visual field; left eye: left visual field However, images are inverted top-to-bottom and left-to-right by lens Therefore, lateral portions of the retina monitor medial portions of visual field
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Photoreception Visual processing begins in the retina , which contains several cell types: Photoreceptor cells – rods and cones Note that photoreceptors are deep within the retina, buried underneath layers of other cells
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Rods and Cones One type of photoreceptor More common in
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This note was uploaded on 06/13/2011 for the course PSYCH 115 taught by Professor Shaine during the Spring '07 term at UCLA.

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Psych_115_-_Vision - PRINCIPLES OF BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE...

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