apa-publishing_borderline_personality_disorder_first_learning-dsm-5-case-example (1).pdf - 18.1 BORDERLINE PERSONALITY DISORDER Borderline Personality

Apa-publishing_borderline_personality_disorder_first_learning-dsm-5-case-example (1).pdf

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Reprinted from First MB, Skodol AE, Williams JBW, Spitzer RL: Learning DSM-5 by Case Example . Arlington, VA, American Psychiatric Association Publishing, 2017. © American Psychiatric Association Publishing. Used with permission. Page 1 of 4 18.1 BORDERLINE PERSONALITY DISORDER Borderline Personality Disorder is def iŶed ďLJ ͞a perǀasiǀe patterŶ of instability in interpersonal relationships, self-image, and affects, and ŵarked iŵpulsiǀitLJ͟ (DSM -5, p. 663). Central to the psychopathology of this disorder are an impaired capacity for attachment to others and maladaptive behavior problems related to separation from others on whom the individual depends. People with this disorder have a significant identity disturbance characterized by a markedly unstable self-image or sense of self. TheLJ ĐhroŶiĐallLJ feel ͞eŵptLJ͟ iŶside. IŶdiǀiduals ǁith BorderliŶe PersoŶalitLJ Disorder ŵake frantic efforts to avoid real or imagined abandonment. They have a pattern of unstable and intense interpersonal relationships, characterized by alternating between idealization (another person can do no wrong), when they feel cared for and supported by another person, and devaluation (another person can do no right), when they feel rejected or abandoned. People with Borderline Personality Disorder are subject to intense affective instability or lability, in which they experience mood swings characterized by intense episodes of dysphoria (a state of feeling unwell or unhappy), irritability, or anxiety for hours or a few days at a time, often in reaction to disappointing interpersonal events or encounters. They may also experience intense anger and have problems controlling anger. People with Borderline Personality Disorder are subject to transient dissociative or paranoid reactions when under stress. They may engage in recurrent suicidal behavior, gestures, or threats, and in self-mutilating behavior. They may also have other problems with impulsivity and engage in other potentially self-damaging acts, such as having indiscriminate sex, abusing substances, driving recklessly, binge eating, or overspending. Borderline Personality Disorder is included as a specific Personality Disorder in the Alternative DSM-5 Model for Personality Disorders (DSM-5, p. 766). The proposed diagnostic criteria describe disorder- specific impairments in personality functioning (e.g., poorly developed and unstable self-image,
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Reprinted from First MB, Skodol AE, Williams JBW, Spitzer RL: Learning DSM-5 by Case Example .
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  • Spring '20
  • Schizophrenia, Borderline personality disorder, Histrionic personality disorder, Zoe Barnes

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