9781423901402_PPT_Ch09 - Information Technology in Theory...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–14. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 9 Introduction to Fiber Optics Information Technology in Theory By Pelin Aksoy and Laura DeNardis
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
2 Objectives Understand the importance of fiber-optic technologies in the information society Identify the fundamental components of a fiber-optic cable Understand the principles by which light travels within a fiber-optic cable, including refraction and total internal reflection Information Technology in Theory
Background image of page 2
3 Objectives (continued) Understand how a single fiber can carry multiple signals through wavelength division multiplexing Learn about the advantages and disadvantages of fiber optics as a transmission medium for various applications Gain exposure to cutting-edge fiber-optic approaches Information Technology in Theory
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
4 Background on Optical Communications Fiber-optic communication Trapping light inside an optical fiber Can carry any form of information Fiber is an optical medium, which means it is capable of transmitting light Based on total internal reflection (TIR) Information Technology in Theory
Background image of page 4
5 Tyndall’s Experiment Information Technology in Theory
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
6 Structure of Fiber-Optic Cables Core Cladding Coating Information Technology in Theory
Background image of page 6
7 General Structure of Fiber-Optic Cables Information Technology in Theory
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
8 General Structure of Fiber-Optic Cables (continued) Information Technology in Theory
Background image of page 8
9 Structure of Fiber-Optic Cables – Cladding Cylindrical material made of glass or specialized plastic Central portion of the fiber Light signal carrying the information travels through the core The diameter of the core can range from a couple of micrometers ( µm -one millionth of a meter) to a couple of millimeters ( mm -one thousandth of a meter) Information Technology in Theory
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
10 Structure of Fiber-Optic Cables – Jacket Surrounds the cladding Insulates and protects the fiber from physical damage and environmental effects, such as moisture, that might interfere with the inner workings of the cable Usually made of opaque plastic or another type of material Information Technology in Theory
Background image of page 10
11 How Light Travels Through Fiber TIR is the basis of fiber-optic communication TIR may be considered to be an extreme case of refraction When a light ray strikes a boundary of two materials with different RIs, it bends, or in other terms, refracts to an extent that depends on the ratio of the RIs of the two materials Information Technology in Theory
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
12 Refraction The phenomenon that causes a spoon inside a clear glass of water to appear shorter and bent to an observer looking from the outside Light rays that strike the water/air boundary bend to create an image that is shorter than the actual height of the spoon in the water, because water has a higher RI than air TIR is the phenomenon that makes the side of an aquarium act as a mirror when viewed at an appropriate angle Information Technology in Theory
Background image of page 12
13 Refractive Index Refractive index of an optical medium = Speed of
Background image of page 13

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 14
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 06/14/2011 for the course CIS 3003 taught by Professor Bauer during the Spring '11 term at University of Central Florida.

Page1 / 44

9781423901402_PPT_Ch09 - Information Technology in Theory...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 14. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online