CS132L-Lesson6

CS132L-Lesson6 - Lesson6 Classes Objectives...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Lesson 6 Classes Objectives Differentiate classes and objects Define a new class and create objects of that class Differentiate member methods from member data Use constructors in declaring and defining a class Construct interface and implementation on separate files.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Lesson 3 Classes Classes allow programmers to code real world objects.  Unlike structures,  class contains member data (fieldnames) and member methods (functions). A  class is a logical method to organize data and functions in the same structure. To  represent real world objects, we need to specify its properties and what it can do. A cat (object) for example can be represented by defining its properties  and what it can do, as reflected in Figure 3. Classes are declared using keyword  class , whose functionality is similar to  that  of  the keyword   struct ,  but  with  the  possibility   of  including  functions  as  members, instead of only data. Declaring a class Syntax: class  class_name  {    permission_label_1:      member1a; Figure 3.  Cat Object Cat properties Has name Has breed Cat properties Can eat
Background image of page 2
    member1b;   permission_label_2:  member2a; member2b;   . ..   }; where  class_name  is a name for the class (user defined  type ). The body of the  declaration can contain  members , that can be either data or function declarations,  and optionally  permission labels , that can be any of these three keywords:  private: public:  or  protected: . They make reference to the permission which the following  members  acquire:  private   members of a class are accessible only from other members of  their same class or from their " friend " classes.  protected  members are accessible from members of their same class and  friend  classes, and also from members of their  derived  classes.  Finally,  public  members are accessible from anywhere the class is visible.  NOTE: If we declare members of a class before including any permission label,  the members are considered   private , since it is the default permission that the  members of a class declared with the  class  keyword acquire. Example: To declare as class cat: class Cat{     public:   void sleep ();        void eat (); private: char name, breed; int age; }; Figure 4.  class Cat  Member names char name char breed Member methods void eat void sleep
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Declaring an object of a class Declaring an object of a class is the same as declaring an instance of a primitive  data type.  For example, the definition int x;   specifies that we create an object x  that will inherit all properties of an int data type.  Creating a class can be viewed 
Background image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 06/14/2011 for the course COMPUTER 091 taught by Professor Rajivsir during the Summer '11 term at MIT.

Page1 / 19

CS132L-Lesson6 - Lesson6 Classes Objectives...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 5. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online