#3 Unified Modeling Language

#3 Unified Modeling Language - -Invented out of...

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- Invented out of necessity - Uses symbols to convey meaning
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Model – collection of pictures & texts that represents something Models consist diagrams and pictures. Model is to Software, Blueprint is to a house Introduced by Ivar Jacobson, James Rumbaugh, and Grady Booch ( three amigos )
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They consist of thousand pictures to a large extent. Simple pictures can convey more information than lots of texts. It is easier to draw some simple pictures than it is to write code or even text that describes the same thing. It is cheaper, faster, and it is easier to change models than it is to change code
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Use Case equivalent of modern cave art. A use case's main symbols are the actor and the use case oval. Responsible for documenting the macro requirements of the system. Think of use case diagrams as the list of capabilities the system must provide. Activity Diagram is the UML version of a flowchart. Activity diagrams are used to analyze processes and, if necessary, perform process reengineering. An activity diagram is an excellent tool for analyzing problems that the system ultimately will have to solve. As an analysis tool, we don't want to start solving the problem at a technical level by assigning classes, but we can use activity diagrams to understand the problem and even refine the processes that comprise the problem.
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Class Diagrams used to show the classes in a system and the relationships between those classes . A single class can be shown in more than one class diagram. it isn't necessary to show all the classes in a single, monolithic class diagram. The greatest value is to show classes and their relationships from various perspectives in a way that will help convey the most useful understanding. Class diagrams show a static view of the system. Class diagrams DO NOT describe behaviors or how instances of the classes interact.
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Interaction Diagrams Sequence Sequence diagrams show the classes along the top and messages sent between those classes, modeling a single flow through the objects in the system. A sequence diagram implies a time ordering by following the sequence of messages from top left to bottom right. Collaboration use the same classes and messages but are organized in a spatial display. Because the collaboration diagram does not indicate a time ordering visually, we number the messages to indicate the order in which they occur.
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State Diagram shows the changing state of a single object as that object passes through a system. Component Diagram
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This note was uploaded on 06/14/2011 for the course COMPUTER 091 taught by Professor Rajivsir during the Summer '11 term at MIT.

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#3 Unified Modeling Language - -Invented out of...

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