Phillips_L_w5_Social_Contract

Phillips_L_w5_Social_Contract - The Social Contract 1 The...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
The Social Contract 1 The Social Contract PHIL-1001-4 Introduction to Philosophy Professor: Murray Skees Walden University Lisa Phillips February 19 th , 2010
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The Social Contract 2 The social contract is an agreement between the people and their ruler or the people and the community in which they live in. “The original inspiration for the notion may derive from the biblical covenant between God and Abraham, but it is most closely associated with the writings of Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, and Jean Jacques Rousseau. (Social Contract, 2010) Along with the social contract connection, each of these philosophers have a certain way a citizen should act. Thomas Hobbes was an English philosopher whose vision of the world is original and still relevant to contemporary politics. “Hobbes argued that the absolute power of the sovereign is justified by a hypothetical social contract in which the people agree to obey him in all matters in return for a guarantee of peace and security, which they lack in the warlike "state of nature" posited to exist before the contract is made.” (Social Contract, 2010) Thomas Hobbes also states that, “Our attention will not be on the question of social and political order, rather on how to maximize liberty, how to define social justice, how to draw the limits of government power, and how to realize democratic ideals” (Williams, 2006). Simply having power, for Rousseau is not sufficient for that power to be morally
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 5

Phillips_L_w5_Social_Contract - The Social Contract 1 The...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online