It is fascinating learning about the different philosophies of different cultures

It is fascinating learning about the different philosophies of different cultures

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Week 6 Discussion It is fascinating learning about the different philosophies of different cultures. Each culture is unique with their philosophies on how to use the world, and view it. We have learned mostly of western philosophy, and the difference that I see is that the other cultures philosophies are documented by words instead of documents. This does not mean that their philosophies should have less merit then western philosophers. Another connection that I seen between different cultures and western philosophy is that most other cultures put a lot on the family values. Family is first and then society comes second. It is clear that women do not play a big role in most western philosophy. One feminist I found to be interesting is Carol Gilligan. She questioned the moral decision philosophy of Lawrence Kohlberg and Emanuel Kant, and did it well. Carol suggested, “women make moral decisions according to different but equally mature and morally upright reasoning” (Solomon &
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Unformatted text preview: Higgins, 2010). Gilligan backs up her claims by running a series of studies, mostly of women, on how a mature woman understands the moral problems. With amazing result, “Gilligan claimed that both types of moral reasoning were important to a fully developed person and society.” (Solomon & Higgins, 2010) East Asian Philosophy is also very interesting to me. Chinese philosophers like Confucius seemed to be passionate. More like a woman’s point of view of the earth. The importance of harmony in life can make the world seem like a better place to live. Chinese philosophers portray that we should enjoy our life and our family, and the world around us. It is like not having a certain place for everyone, but a place that everyone is accepted. References Solomon, R. C., & Higgins, K. M. (2010). The Big Questions: A short Introduction to Philosophy (Eighth Edition ed.). Belmont: Wadsworth, Cengage Learning....
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This note was uploaded on 06/14/2011 for the course PHIL 1001 taught by Professor Murrayskees during the Winter '10 term at Walden University.

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