Lecture 11 - What makes the arguments of Meditation Two...

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What makes the arguments of Meditation Two valid? There is an idea that represents me. Therefore, something that has that idea (“I”) exists. There is an idea that represents me thinking. Therefore, something that has that idea (“I”) is thinking. There is an idea that represents me judging, willing, imagining, etc. Therefore, something that has that idea (“I”) is judging, willing, and imagining, etc. There is an idea with a particular objective reality. Therefore, the cause of that idea has at least that much formal reality. In other words, there must be at least as much formal reality in the cause of an idea as there is objective reality in the idea itself.
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Objections I have an idea of Santa Claus, but does that mean that Santa Claus exists? I have an idea of myself as a human being with a body, but does that mean that I am a human being with a body? Couldn’t I just make up an idea of something perfect and unlimited, even if nothing perfect and unlimited exists?
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The conclusion of Meditation Three Descartes has proven that his creator is a completely perfect and unlimited being. But recall the worry raised
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Lecture 11 - What makes the arguments of Meditation Two...

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