Critical Thinking

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Click to edit Master subtitle style  6/15/11 Credibility Ch. 4
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 6/15/11 Credibility Grounds for suspicion **E-mails from banks or companies asking for  personal information should always be viewed with  suspicion.** First ground of suspicion is the claim itself.  (Is it  likely that you really won $10,000,000 and just have  to provide your bank account # in order to receive  it?) The second ground for suspicion is the source of the  claim.  (Do you personally know John Q. Public from 
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 6/15/11 Varying Degrees of Credibility Some sources are more credible than others. An  interested party  is someone who will benefit from  our belief  in the claim. (company sponsoring  commercial, for example) disinterested party  has no stake in whether or not  we believe in the claim. (unbiased news reporter, for  example) We often use irrelevant information about a person  when deciding their credibility (i.e., physical  appearance, education, etc.).
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When does a claim lack credibility? Claims that clash with our personal knowledge   or observations should not be considered  credible. However, there are times when our personal  observations are not reliable.  For instance,  memories fade with the passage of time, and  health issues, etc. can also distort memories. Still, first hand sources should generally be 
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ch4notes - Ch.4 ClicktoeditMastersubtitlestyle Credibility...

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