Communication in the Workplace

Communication in the Workplace - Communication Running...

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Communication 1 Running head: COMMUNICATION Communication Joel L. Smith Ashford University Interpersonal Communication COM 200 Kennedy Kelechi Halams April 27, 2009
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Communication In this paper, we will discuss communication. Communication is one of the most important tools in the workplace, and we will learn what interpersonal communication is, and what the ins and out of communication principles are, and how to use them. The different types of communications are important as well, and we will also learn what their importance is in the communication process. Communication has always been one of the most important tools in the workplace, and in life in general. “Communication is the heart of every organisation. Everything you do in the workplace results from communication. Therefore good reading, writing, speaking and listening skills are essential if tasks are going to be completed and goals achieved. As you develop your career you will find various reasons why successful communication skills are important to you” (Taylor, 2009). We all play a role in the process, and it is important that we understand those roles. To understand communication, we must understand what communication is. “Communication is any process in which people share information, ideas, and feelings. It involves not only the spoken and written word but also body language, personal mannerisms, and style – anything that adds meaning to a message” (Hybels & Weaver II, 2007, p. 8). Many people feel that communication is based purely on something which is said or written, but as we will learn later, there are other important parts of the communication process. There are several elements that are involved within communication, the first of these are senders and receivers. “First, in most communication situations, people are sender-receivers – both sending and receiving at the same time. When you are discussing a problem with a close friend, your friend may be talking, but by listening closely, you are acting as a receiver. By paying careful attention, putting your hand on his or her arm, and showing genuine concern you
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are sending as many messages as you get, even though you may not say a word. Second, in all situations, sender-receivers share meaning. In your discussion with a close friend, both of you share the language and also share understanding of the situation” (Hybels & Weaver II, 2007, p. 8-9). In addition to sender-receivers, we have the message. This is the important part of the conversation; the bread and butter. “The message is made up of the ideas and feelings that sender-receivers want to share” (Hybels & Weaver II, p. 9). Another important tool of communication is the symbol. This is one thing that we all associate with another. These can include nonverbal symbols such as a gesture of some sort. “The channel is the route traveled by a message; it is the means a message uses to reach the sender-receivers” (Hybels & Weaver II, p.
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This note was uploaded on 06/15/2011 for the course COM 200 taught by Professor Martin during the Spring '11 term at Ashford University.

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Communication in the Workplace - Communication Running...

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