Organizational Change

Organizational Change - Organizational Change Running head:...

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Organizational Change 1 Running head: ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE Organizational Change Joel L. Smith Ashford University Organizational Change MGT 435 Mary Alexander November 18, 2007
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Organizational Change In this paper, I will go over what constitutes change, and how to constantly evolve an organization around change. In addition, it will also go over strategic organizational responses, and the importance of the role of a change agent. Next, we will discuss how to create and manage change, and create an innovative organization. My analysis of organizational change is based on an important contrast in change; this distinction between change that is either continuous or episodic. This contrast is sufficiently central in conceptualization of change that I use it as the framework that organizes this paper. The contrast between episodic and continuous change reflects differences in the perspective of the observer. From a distance, when observers examine the flow of events that constitute organizing, they see what looks like repetitive action, routine and inertia dotted with occasional episodes of revolutionary change. But from a closer view, a successful changing organization suggests ongoing adaptation and adjustment. Although these adjustments may be small, they tend to frequent and continuous across time, which means they are capable of altering structure and strategy. “Total organization change involves introducing and sustaining multiple policies, practices, and procedures across multiple units and levels. Such change can enhance the organization’s culture and success, and can be sustained over time” (Bateman & Snell, 2003, pg. 39). According to this assumption, change is something that happens gradually in a successful organization. Convergence is interrupted sporadically by epochs of change described by words like revolution, deep change, and transformation. The phrase ‘episodic change is used to group together organizational changes that tend to be infrequent, discontinuous, and intentional. The presumption is that episodic change occurs during periods of divergence when organizations are moving away from their equilibrium
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conditions. The divergence is the result of a growing misalignment between an inertial deep structure and perceived environmental demands. I label this form of change as episodic, because it tends to occur in distinct periods during which shifts are precipitated by “external forces”
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This note was uploaded on 06/15/2011 for the course MGT 435 taught by Professor Stepp during the Spring '10 term at Ashford University.

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Organizational Change - Organizational Change Running head:...

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