Chapter 1

Chapter 1 - Chapter1 RiskinOurSociety 1) Traditionally,...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 1 Risk in Our Society 1) Traditionally, risk has been defined as A) any situation in which the probability of loss is one. B) any situation in which the probability of loss is zero. C) uncertainty concerning the occurrence of loss. D) the probability of a loss occurring. Answer: C Question Status: Revised 2) Objective risk is defined as A) the probability of loss. B) the relative variation of actual loss from expected loss. C) uncertainty based on a person ʹ s mental condition or state of mind. D) the cause of loss. Answer: B Question Status: Previous Edition 3) An insurance company estimates its objective risk for 10,000 exposures at 10 percent. Assuming the probability of loss remains the same, what would happen to the objective risk if the number of exposures were to increase to 1 million? A) It would decrease to 1 percent. B) It would decrease to 5 percent. C) It would remain the same. D) It would increase to 20 percent. Answer: A Question Status: Previous Edition 4) Uncertainty based on a person ʹ s mental condition or state of mind is known as A) objective risk. B) subjective risk. C) objective probability. D) subjective probability. Answer: B Question Status: Previous Edition 2 Rejda · Principles of Risk Management and Insurance , Tenth Edition 5) The long-run relative frequency of an event based on the assumption of an infinite number of observations with no change in the underlying conditions is called A) objective probability. B) objective risk. C) subjective probability. D) subjective risk. Answer: A Question Status: Previous Edition 6) Which of the following statements about a priori  probabilities is correct? A) They are subjective probabilities based on ambiguity in the way probability is perceived. B) They are subjective probabilities that may vary among individuals because of factors such as age, gender, education, and the use of alcohol. C) They are objective probabilities that can be determined by deductive reasoning. D) They are objective probabilities that can be determined by subjective reasoning.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Answer: C Question Status: Previous Edition 7) An individual ʹ s personal estimate of the chance of loss is A) an objective probability. B) an objective risk. C) a subjective probability. D) an a priori  probability. Answer: C Question Status: Previous Edition 8) A peril is A) a moral hazard. B) the cause of a loss. C) a condition which increases the chance of a loss. D) the probability that a loss will occur. Answer: B Question Status: Previous Edition Chapter 1 Risk in Our Society 3 9) An earthquake is an example of a A) moral hazard. B) peril. C) physical hazard. D) objective risk. Answer: B Question Status: Previous Edition 10) Dense fog that increases the chance of an automobile accident is an example of a A) speculative risk. B) peril.
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 06/15/2011 for the course RIM 3331 taught by Professor Papp during the Spring '11 term at Troy.

Page1 / 9

Chapter 1 - Chapter1 RiskinOurSociety 1) Traditionally,...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online