notes II - 3/23/11PartyOrg.intheUS I. 20:00 Party...

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3/23/11 Party Org. in the US 20:00 I. Party Organizations: PIE (1 st part of Class) PO(current topic) Why study o Individual candidate come and go—Bush’s rise and current left of influence. Carter is nothing to the Democratic organization and even Bill Clinton now. o Instill stability and organizations over time, people come and go, but these org. are looking out for the long term goals of the party o It is org. that make for responsive government, not individuals. It is the organization that tries to aggregate these interests. o Organization appears to reflect the level of ideological disparity, or distance o (graphs) o strong parties have been regulated by the states in recent time Objective measures of party org. strengths: Budgets Staff Computing capacity Net-presence Membership o There really is no formal membership o We are really talking about staff, activistis, etc. The key level in the US is the county level organization. o Perhaps the most used is precinct. Party Organization  multi-nucleic o Change: o Technological development in campaigning (Social media, etc) New cadre of specialists: polsters, media concultants, web-gurus, etc. Service Orgs. Staffers
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3/25-Party Organization 20:00 I. Party Organization: Staffers: (Chart) o Activists: all sort of political participatory activity. Moved to be more o Primary Voters: o Office Holders: o Voters: o More amateurs, more ideologically extreme as become more acute in recent years (one of the main sources of polarization) Organizational Activity: 2008-2009 Period Democrats Republicans High Frequency Low Frequency Campaign Literature 74-79% 80% Fundraising 70% 65-68% Organize Rallies 68% 65% Contribute $ 60% 70% Canvassing 60% 60% Newspaper ads <60% <60% Mailings 45% 45% Registratio n drives 55% 45% TV ads 31% 33% Surveys 11% 16% Billboards 10% 13%
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3/25-Party Organization 20:00 o FECA ( 1971, 74’) Regulated contributions: individuals, parties, and interest groups. Told them how to contribute legally to the contributions Regulated campaign spending ( rule unconstitutional for free speech reasons) you are limited on what you can give the the candidate, but you cannot limit how much the candidate wants to spend of their own money. o BCRA (2002) o Political parties were able to raise unlimited amounts of money for party building procedures. They figured out that this could be a loop hole (soft money) from the act in 1971. There are limits—as long as you do not advocate for one candidate or the defeat of another you can use that money. As long as you don’t mention “voting” for that person you are fine.
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This note was uploaded on 06/16/2011 for the course GOV 325 taught by Professor Shaw during the Spring '08 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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notes II - 3/23/11PartyOrg.intheUS I. 20:00 Party...

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