205-ch. 2 - Chapter2 Classification & Treatment Plans

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Comer,  Fundamentals of Abnormal Psychology , 5e – Chapter 3 Chapter 2 Chapter 2 Classification & Treatment Plans 1
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Comer,  Fundamentals of Abnormal Psychology , 5e – Chapter 3 Classification  Classification  Client: the person seeking psychological treatment (preferred over the term patient) Patient: refers to someone who is ill, & is consistent with the medical model 2
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Comer,  Fundamentals of Abnormal Psychology , 5e – Chapter 3 Classification Classification Comorbid: co-existing psychiatric conditions Reliability: a given diagnosis will be consistent with a particular set of symptoms Validity: the diagnosis represents real 3
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Comer,  Fundamentals of Abnormal Psychology , 5e – Chapter 3 Classification  Classification  Base rate: the frequency with which it occurs in the general population Syndrome: a collection of symptoms that forms a definable pattern Mental disorder: a clinically significant behavioral or psychological syndrome or pattern resulting in impairment of functioning 4
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Comer,  Fundamentals of Abnormal Psychology , 5e – Chapter 3 Classification Classification Considerations The medical model: employs the use of terms such as mental disorders & neurosis. Mental disorder suggests a condition that is “inside one’s mind” & has a negative connotation The term psychological disorder is an attempt to move away from negative stereotypes 5
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Comer,  Fundamentals of Abnormal Psychology , 5e – Chapter 3 Classification Classification Neurosis: has it’s roots in psychoanalytic theory, is vague, uncomplimentary & suggests subjective involvement References behavior that is distressing, enduring, & without any physical basis (ex. someone who worries over nothing) 6
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Comer,  Fundamentals of Abnormal Psychology , 5e – Chapter 3 Classification Classification Neurosis It is still used informally to describe someone who experiences excessive psychological pain The term is used to distinguish from those who are referred to as psychotic” Psychosis refers to various forms of behavior involving a “loss of contact” with reality. 7
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Comer,  Fundamentals of Abnormal Psychology , 5e – Chapter 3 Diagnosis: Does the Client’s Syndrome  Diagnosis: Does the Client’s Syndrome  Match a Known Disorder? Match a Known Disorder? Using all available information, clinicians attempt to paint a “clinical picture” Influenced by their theoretical orientation Using assessment data and the clinical picture, clinicians attempt to make a diagnosis A determination that a person’s problems reflect a particular disorder or syndrome Based on an existing classification system 8
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This note was uploaded on 06/20/2011 for the course PSYCH 205 taught by Professor Underhill during the Summer '11 term at Moraine Valley Community College.

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205-ch. 2 - Chapter2 Classification & Treatment Plans

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