CH18 - part A - Chapter 18 Electric Forces and Electric...

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Chapter 18 Electric Forces and Electric Fields
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18.1 The Origin of Electricity Electrical nature of matter is inherent in atomic structure. Simplified view of atom heavy, positively charged nucleus orbited by one or more negatively charged electrons Nucleus contains positively charged protons and electrically neutral neutrons Charges on protons and electrons are of equal magnitude , but of opposite sign
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18.1 The Origin of Electricity kg 10 673 . 1 27 p m kg 10 675 . 1 27 n m kg 10 11 . 9 31 e m C 10 60 . 1 19 e coulombs
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18.1 The Origin of Electricity In nature, atoms are normally found with equal numbers of protons and electrons, so they are electrically neutral. By adding or removing electrons from matter it will acquire a net electric charge with magnitude equal to e times the number of electrons added or removed, N . Atom then called an ion . Ne q
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18.1 The Origin of Electricity Example 1 A Lot of Electrons How many electrons are there in one coulomb of negative charge?
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18.2 Charged Objects and the Electric Force It is possible to transfer electric charge from one object to another. The body that loses electrons has an excess of positive charge, while the body that gains electrons has an excess of negative charge. - - - - + + + + Glass rod Silk
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18.2 Charged Objects and the Electric Force LAW OF CONSERVATION OF ELECTRIC CHARGE During any process, the net electric charge of an isolated (closed) system remains constant (is conserved). - - - - + + + + Glass rod Silk
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Charged Objects and the Electric Force Two electrically charged objects exert a force on one another. Consider motion of and forces on two small balls with net “+” or “-” charge. Like charges repel and unlike
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This note was uploaded on 06/21/2011 for the course PH 202 taught by Professor Nordlund during the Spring '08 term at University of Alabama at Birmingham.

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CH18 - part A - Chapter 18 Electric Forces and Electric...

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