Writing About Literature PPt.

Writing About Literature PPt. - Writing About Literature EH...

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Unformatted text preview: Writing About Literature EH 223 Having a Valid Thesis Your thesis should be valid: Your thesis should be arguable (opinion rather than fact) Your thesis should be open to evidence Your thesis should be open to counterevidence Having a Valid Thesis The idea is not to find the one right way of interpreting a text The idea is to find your way and then show your audience how your interpretation is reasonable by providing evidence and explanation. Having a Valid Thesis First Example: Bradford uses this passage to tell about the hardships the pilgrims faced on the way to North America. Second Example: Bradfords writing strategies encourage the belief that an individuals morality could be determined by his social class. The first example merely summarizes the explicit message of the text. Anyone could see this from reading the text. The second example offers an interpretation of the text. The writer will need to explain how the explicit details of the text actually work to create the meaning argued. Providing Sufficient Support Help your readers understand your reasoning Never make a claim and just move on Ask yourself: What will my readers need to know to understand my argument? Will my readers have questions that I need to address? What objections will my readers have to my claims? (What about this ? Why not that ? ) How can I address those possible objections? Always support your claims with: Textual evidence Explanation See Winthrop example (slide 23) Be clear Explain your claims State your claims explicitly Be concise Get to the point Avoid unnecessary words Be coherent Make sure all parts fit together Show clear connections between ideas It is my opinion that, as Winthrop writes this passage, he might be trying to say that social class differences in the Massachusetts Bay colony and in the world around them are decided upon by God and that God wants them to exist. Winthrop says in this passage that social class differences in the colony are God-ordained. Example: Use active voice Ex. Of Plymouth Plantation can be read as being about Bradfords characterization of the Puritans....
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Writing About Literature PPt. - Writing About Literature EH...

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