Swinging from Birches - John Bieler Professor Edgerly...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: John Bieler Professor Edgerly English 112 11 April 2007 Swinging from Birches Robert Frost paints a romantic portrait of freedom in his poem Birches. Critic Steve Delaney once wrote, I became a fan of birches, thanks to Robert Frost, (15). In the poem Birches, the metaphor of swinging on birches is a means of transcendence for the narrator in three ways: it allows the writer to revert to childhood, escape from lifes troubles, and reach heavenly realms. Swinging on birches allows the narrator to revert back to his childhood. First of all, the narrator explains how he once was a swinger of birches. According to Delaney, The idea of swinging on a tree that would be kind enough to bend and set me down again after a free ride was enough to fuel the imagination., (15). Furthermore, the narrator prefers to imagine that a young boy had been bending over the birch trees just as the narrator had once done. In Birches Frost writes, With all her matter-of-fact about the narrator had once done....
View Full Document

Page1 / 3

Swinging from Birches - John Bieler Professor Edgerly...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online