Symbols in the Great Gatsby

Symbols in the Great Gatsby - Bieler 1 John Bieler...

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John Bieler Professor Edgerly English 112 21 March 2007 Symbols in the Great Gatsby F. Scott Fitzgerald’s novel The Great Gatsby is filled with symbols. Critic Sister M. Bettina describes Fitzgerald as, “an ironist, and simultaneously engaged in and detached from his subject,” (140). Fitzgerald has a way of using symbols to add emphasis to settings and themes. For example, the setting of West and East Egg are symbolic of the “new money” and “old money.” This adds further emphasis to the setting of the novel along with its geographic importance. Symbols that can be traced throughout the novel are the green light that shines on the end of Daisy’s dock, T.J. Eckleburg’s eyes, and the valley of ashes. The green light that shines at the end of Daisy’s East egg dock is symbolic of Gatsby’s hopes and dreams for his future with Daisy. First of all, the green light is visible from Gatsby’s lawn and in the first chapter Gatsby is seen reaching out for his dream in the darkness. Bettina describes this scene, “Gatsby alone on his vast lawn at night,
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This note was uploaded on 06/21/2011 for the course ENG 112 taught by Professor Jones during the Spring '08 term at Northern Virginia Community College.

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Symbols in the Great Gatsby - Bieler 1 John Bieler...

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