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095001 - HUGH LLOYD-JONES T WO C ONJE CT URE S ON P I NDAR...

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H UGH L LOYD -J ONES T WO C ONJECTURES ON P INDAR’S F OURTH P AEAN (50–3) aus: Zeitschrift für Papyrologie und Epigraphik 95 (1993) 1–5 © Dr. Rudolf Habelt GmbH, Bonn
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1 T WO C ONJECTURES ON P INDAR ' S F OURTH P AEAN (50-3) Ian Rutherford has lately been kind enough to allow me an early view of a detailed study of the paean he has been preparing, in which he has discussed the difficult problems of the Fourth Paean in detail. And now Lutz Käppel has published a learned study of the same genre (Paian: Studien zur Geschichte einer Gattung (Berlin, 1992), which includes, in its third chapter (p. 87f.), the most detailed commentary on the Fourth Paean so far published. Written for the Ceans to perform at Delos, this poem tells how Euxantios, son of Minos by the Cean princess Dexithea, refused to abandon his rocky native island for the sake of a kingdom in his father's much greater island, Crete. The work of Rutherford and Käppel has stimulated me into making an attempt to solve two major cruces which have puzzled everyone who has had to do with this poem, ever since Grenfell and Hunt in 1908 published Part V of the Oxyrhynchus Papyri and with it P.Oxy. 841, which contains almost all that we possess of it. Addressing his own mind, i.e. himself, Euxantios tells it to leave alone the cypress, and to leave alone something else which I will not at this point try to translate. Then he says that to him has been given a small... - then follow corrupt words - but that he has no share in mourning or in revolutions: ¶a, frÆn, kupãri!- !on, ¶a d¢ nomÚn peridãion. §mo‹ dÉ Ùl¤gon d°dotai ya[ oÈ peny°vn dÉ ¶laxon, <oÈ> !ta!¤vn (50-3) 52 e S ]dotai ya`[ et Plutarcho (vid. infra) suppl. Blass et edd.pr. Plutarchus, De exilio p.602 F œi dÉ ¶je!tin efi! mikrån épobãnti n∞!on oÈ mikr«n éphllãxyai kak«n, oto! êyliÒ! §!ti mØ pro!lal«n •aut«i tå Pindarikã mhdÉ §pãidvn pollãki! §lafrån kupãri!!on fil°ein, §çn d¢ nomÒn KrÆta! perida¤vn. §mo‹ dÉ Ùl¤gon m¢n gç! d°dotai, ˜yen êdru!, peny°vn dÉ oÈk ¶laxon !ta!¤vn oÈd¢ pro!tagmãtvn ≤gemonik«n oÈdÉ Ípourgi«n §n politika›! xre¤ai! ka‹ leitourgi«n du!paraitÆtvn. nomÚn peridãion - the latter word is Hermann's correction of Plutarch's perida¤vn - was taken by the first editors to mean 'the region around Mount Ida'. Grenfell and Hunt were rebuked by Housman, Cl.Rev. 22 (1908) 10 = Classical Papers (1972) II 766 for not knowing that the iota of the word ÖIdh was long, and Wilamowitz, Pindaros (1922), 475 raised the same objection, taking peridãion to mean 'ein Revier zwischen Feinden'. Käppel, op.cit., p.124, n.127 rightly objects that the Cretans were not enemies, but when he defends the view of the first editors, quoting as a parallel the variable quantity of the first syllable of xru!Ò! , he does not convince. The existence of the common noun ‡dh , meaning
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2 H.Lloyd-Jones 'timber', seems to me to supply an extra reason for thinking it must unlikely that the quantity of this particular vowel can vary. Can we find another solution?
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