The Brothers - Project Gutenberg's The Comedies of Terence,...

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Project Gutenberg's The Comedies of Terence, by Publius Terentius Afer Title: The Comedies of Terence Author: Publius Terentius Afer Translator: George Colman *** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK THE COMEDIES OF TERENCE *** [Transcriber's Note: Comprising Literal Translations of Cæsar. Virgil. Sallust. Horace. Terence. Tacitus. 2 Vols. Livy. 2 Vols. Cicero's Orations. Cicero's Offices, Lælius, Cato Major, Paradoxes, Scipio's Dream, Letter to Quintus. Cicero On Oratory and Orators. Cicero's Tusculan Disputations, The Nature of the Gods, and The Commonwealth. Juvenal. Xenophon. Homer's Iliad. Homer's Odyssey. Herodotus. Demosthenes. 2 Vols. Thucydides. Æschylus. Sophocles. Euripides. 2 Vols. Plato (Select Dialogues). CONTENTS. COMEDIES OF TERENCE: IN VERSE. The Andrian 367 The Eunuch 408 The Self-Tormentor 451 The Brothers 494 The Step-Mother 535 Phormio 568 THE COMEDIES OF TERENCE.
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HORACE. THE ANDRIAN. PERSONS REPRESENTED. PROLOGUE. SIMO. PAMPHILUS. CHREMES. CHARINUS. CRITO. SOSIA. DAVUS. BYRRHIA. DROMO. SERVANTS, ETC. GLYCERIUM. MYSIS. LESBIA. ARCHYLLIS. SCENE, ATHENS. Prologue. The Bard, when first he gave his mind to write, Thought it his only business, that his Plays Should please the people: but it now falls out, He finds, much otherwise, and wastes, perforce, His time in writing Prologues; not to tell The argument, but to refute the slanders Broach'd by the malice of an older Bard. And mark what vices he is charg'd withal! Menander wrote the Andrian and Perinthian: Know one, and you know both; in argument Less diff'rent than in sentiment and style. What suited with the Andrian he confesses From the Perinthian he transferr'd, and us'd For his: and this it is these sland'rers blame, Proving by deep and learned disputation, That Fables should not be contaminated. Troth! all the knowledge is they nothing know: Who, blaming; him, blame Nævius, Plautus, Ennius, Whose great example is his precedent; Whose negligence he'd wish to emulate Rather than _their_ dark diligence. Henceforth, Let them, I give them warning, be at peace,
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And cease to rail, lest they be made to know Their own misdeeds. Be favorable! sit With equal mind, and hear our play; that hence Ye may conclude, what hope to entertain, The comedies he may hereafter write Shall merit approbation or contempt. [Changes: ACT THE FIRST. SCENE I. _SIMO, SOSIA, and SERVANTS with Provisions._ SIMO. Carry those things in: go! (_Ex. SERVANTS._ Sosia, come here; A word with you! SOSIA. I understand: that these Be ta'en due care of. SIMO. Quite another thing. SOSIA. What can my art do more for you? SIMO. This business Needs not that art; but those good qualities, Which I have ever known abide in you, Fidelity and secrecy. SOSIA. I wait
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The Brothers - Project Gutenberg's The Comedies of Terence,...

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