Attitudes in the Workplace

Attitudes in the Workplace - Managing Attitudes in the...

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Managing Attitudes in the Workplace TMGT 492 Industrial Supervision Managing Attitudes in the Workplace
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In society, people perform work in many ways. People work to earn money, support their families, volunteer their time, and make their yards look better. Work is done for many reasons, and helps individuals and companies alike. It has been said by an anonymous supervisor in a car factory, “It’s not the ability to do the job that counts, it’s whether they’ve got the right attitude.” Attitudes toward the work being done however can sometimes be negative. These negative attitudes about work can decrease employee moral and decrease worker outputs The following is a discussion of attitudes and what supervisor’s can do in order to improve attitudes in the workplace, which will in turn improve overall employee moral, and increase outputs. Attitude is a person's feelings about objects, activities, events, and other people. These feelings usually are learned over time and are a major factor in determining individual behavior. Ferdinand Fournies, author of the book Coaching For Improved Work Performance , defines attitude as “how people feel about themselves, and the world around them, and can include quite specific feelings or values, such as likes, and dislikes.” Attitude is a disposition towards other persons, inanimate objects or ideas or abstract concepts, or a mixture of feelings, knowledge, and a predisposition to behave towards them, if given the opportunity to do so. A person’s attitude is relatively permanent (Ferdinand, pg 53). There are three basic components of attitudes: cognitive, affective, and behavioral. Each plays a major role in attitude formation. The cognitive component is the set of values and beliefs that a person has toward a person, an object, or an event. For example, a coworker tells us, "I don't like the boss. He's out to get me." The cognitive component of this attitude is the belief that the boss is unfair or punitive. The cognitive component creates the basis or reason for the negative attitude. If the worker were to change his mind and believe that the boss was fair, the basis for the attitude would change and the worker would now have a positive attitude toward the boss (Hodgetts, pg 81).
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The affective component is the emotional feeling that is attached to an attitude. It is the emotion that is felt with regard to a person, an object, or an event. When we feel happiness or anger or disappointment, this is the affective component. When our favorite baseball team loses an important game and we feel sad, this too is a result of the affective component. The affective component is a result of our feelings toward someone or something. The cognitive component influences the affective component. The person who dislikes the boss may feel happy when he learns that the manager has been transferred to
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This note was uploaded on 06/21/2011 for the course MGT 501 taught by Professor Johnson during the Spring '11 term at Touro CA.

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Attitudes in the Workplace - Managing Attitudes in the...

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