Government Organizations and Regulations Impact on Industrial Hygiene Program

Government Organizations and Regulations Impact on Industrial Hygiene Program

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Government Organizations and Regulations Impact on Industrial Hygiene Program Indiana State University Industrial Hygiene Hlth 315
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Government Organizations and Regulations Impact on Industrial Hygiene Program The Occupational Safety and Health Association (OSHA) became a legal force in the United States on April 28, 1971, when the OSHAct went into effect. OSHA was created by the Department of Labor to enforce the responsibilities assigned by the act. The OSHAct gives the Department of Labor the authority to create, change, or remove any safety and health standards or regulations. The act allows the Department of Labor to conduct inspections and investigations and to issue citations, propose penalties, require employers to keep records of safety and health data, petition the courts to restrain imminent danger situations, and to approve or reject plans from states who are proposing to assume jurisdiction from federal OSHA over their private sector industries and state and local governments. The Secretary of Labor has the authority regarding federal agencies to inspect any agency worksites based on compensation data and to issue notices of violation when appropriate. The secretary is responsible to make sure that all government agencies are in compliance with OSHA’s regulations. The act also allows the Department of Labor to provide training and education to employees and employers which they do through the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS). The DHHS is directed by law to delegate some of its statutory functions to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). The National Institute for Environmental Safety and Health (NIESH) is an agency within the DHHS as well and they do grant work to obtain funds for organizations interested in training employees and others on health hazards, primarily hazardous waste handling. The secretary and/or the secretaries assignee is authorized to consult with employers, employees, and organizations regarding prevention of injuries and illness under section 7c. Federal OSHA cannot conduct onsite consultation, except when they have contracted with someone under section 7c. After consultation, the secretary of the DHHS may grant funds to the states to identify program needs and plan development, experiments, demonstrations, administration, and operation of programs. The secretary of labor along with the secretary of the DHHS is required also by law to develop and maintain a statistics program for occupational safety and health. The OSHAct sets out two duties for employers and one for employees. The general duty provisions include the following. Each employer shall furnish to each employee a place of employment free from recognized hazards that cause or are likely to cause death or serious physical harm to the employee. The next is each employer shall comply with occupational safety and health standards under the act. The last general duty provision is that each employee shall comply with occupational safety and health
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Government Organizations and Regulations Impact on Industrial Hygiene Program

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