Organizational Structure and Open Systems

Organizational Structure and Open Systems - Organizational...

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Organizational Structure and Open Systems: How Symphonies and Military Units Are Like Living Systems Trident University International MGT501, Module 2, Case
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Organizational Structure and Open Systems: How Symphonies and Military Units Are Like Living Systems In today’s global economy, it is important for businesses and organizations to function at the highest rate of effectiveness and efficiency. In order to function effectively and efficiently, businesses and organizations must grow and adapt to changes in the environment within which it operates. Being able to adapt to changes within the environment will eventually lead to the success or failure of the business or organization. There are many comparisons that can be made with regard to organizations. Organizations should not be viewed solely as a machine that functions for its own benefit, without any concern for the environment. Organizations should be viewed as living systems that are made up of smaller units that work inter-dependently to create the entire organism. Two examples of organizations viewed as organisms are the military and an orchestra. These two organizations must depend on the environment and the way in which its subunits or subsystems interact with each other to survive. Subunits or sub systems can be viewed as different aspects of an organization that contribute to its working parts. The Open System According to Roelof (N.D.), an open system is any distinct entity such as a cell, a person, a forest, or even an orchestra organization or a military unit. In this open system, resources are taken in from the external environment, and the organization or business, utilizes the resources through some kind of process, also called “throughput”. The organization then produces some form of output, product, or service, as a result of the resources or inputs, and the throughput. In this type of open system, survival is dependent upon the environment, and interactions between its subsystems or component parts. The open system approach to organizational structure and
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change is concerned with relationships and patterns of interaction between subsystems and their environments within the organization. The relationships and reciprocal influences between the organization and the environment outside its formal boundary are also important in open system approach. Comparisons In an open structure, it is very easy to compare a business or organization to a living system. There are many concepts and descriptive terms such as, environmental conditions, life cycles, adaptation, needs, or survival of the fittest that can describe both living systems and businesses or organizations. Symphony Orchestra Organizations
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This note was uploaded on 06/21/2011 for the course MGT 501 taught by Professor Johnson during the Winter '11 term at Touro CA.

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Organizational Structure and Open Systems - Organizational...

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