The Glass Ceiling and Gender Equality in the Military

The Glass Ceiling and Gender Equality in the Military - 1...

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1 Running head: THE GLASS CEILING The Glass Ceiling and Gender Equality in the Military TUI University
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2 THE GLASS CEILING The Glass Ceiling and Gender Equality in the Military Women have long been the victim of discrimination in the workplace. Acknowledgement of this discrimination has been recognized and documented over the last 3 or 4 decades. Even though the Civil Rights Act of 1964 outlawed sexual discrimination, women in the work place have made less money and been promoted less than their male counterparts. The term “glass ceiling” has been used to describe the invisible barriers that obstruct the career advancement of women in the American workforce. The glass ceiling describes how on the surface there seems to be a clear and direct path of promotion, but in actuality women tend to hit a point at which they seem unable to progress further in their careers. The glass ceiling refers to situations where the advancement of qualified candidates within the organizational structure of a business is stopped at a lower level because of some form of discrimination, usually sexism or racism. Now the term glass ceiling refers to not only women and minorities, but to gays and lesbians, those with physical disabilities such as deaf or blind people, and the aging population. Even today, gender inequality still exists in the work place. A report in 1994 by Catalyst, a New York based nonprofit research and advisory organization advancing the role of women in business, confirms that the upward mobility of women is still hindered. A follow up report by
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This note was uploaded on 06/21/2011 for the course ETHICS 501 taught by Professor Johnson during the Winter '11 term at Touro CA.

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The Glass Ceiling and Gender Equality in the Military - 1...

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