cell study - 1 Running Head Importance of Studying the Cell...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Importance of the study of Cells  1 Running Head: Importance of Studying the Cell and its Components. Tracy Huffman Biology Instructor Catherine Sommervold May 28, 2011
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Importance of Studying the Cell and its Components  2 Importance of Studying the Cell and its Components The bodies of all animals and plants are made up of tiny microscopic units called cells. These make up the structure of the organism and are responsible for carrying out the various processes characteristic of the organism. Some organisms are composed of only one cell and are referred to as unicellular and include Amoeba, Paramecium and bacteria. Others are composed of many cells and are said to be multicellular and this mainly includes higher plants and animals. Cells were first described in 1665 by an English Biologist, Robert Hooke after he invented the simple microscope. Thereafter he used it to examine thin slices of cork, a substance that comes from the back of a tree. He noted that the material was composed of tiny boxes which he called cells. Hooke observed that other living material was also composed of cells. This work laid the foundation of the cell theory which postulates that all living things are made up of cells (Mazzarello, 1999). Therefore to get a clear understanding of the physiology and morphology of living
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 06/18/2011 for the course BIO 1020 taught by Professor Sommervold during the Spring '11 term at North South University.

Page1 / 5

cell study - 1 Running Head Importance of Studying the Cell...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online