Chapter1 - Chapter 1 Complex Numbers Die ganzen Zahlen hat...

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Chapter 1 Complex Numbers Die ganzen Zahlen hat der liebe Gott geschaffen, alles andere ist Menschenwerk. (God created the integers, everything else is made by humans.) Leopold Kronecker (1823–1891) 1.0 Introduction The real numbers have nice properties. There are operations such as addition, subtraction, mul- tiplication as well as division by any real number except zero. There are useful laws that govern these operations such as the commutative and distributive laws. You can also take limits and do calculus. But you cannot take the square root of - 1. Equivalently, you cannot find a root of the equation x 2 + 1 = 0 . (1.1) Most of you have heard that there is a “new” number i that is a root of the Equation (1.1). That is, i 2 + 1 = 0 or i 2 = - 1. We will show that when the real numbers are enlarged to a new system called the complex numbers that includes i , not only do we gain a number with interesting properties, but we do not lose any of the nice properties that we had before. Specifically, the complex numbers, like the real numbers, will have the operations of addition, subtraction, multiplication as well as division by any complex number except zero. These operations will follow all the laws that we are used to such as the commutative and distributive laws. We will also be able to take limits and do calculus. And, there will be a root of Equation (1.1). In the next section we show exactly how the complex numbers are set up and in the rest of this chapter we will explore the properties of the complex numbers. These properties will be both algebraic properties (such as the commutative and distributive properties mentioned already) and also geometric properties. You will see, for example, that multiplication can be described geometrically. In the rest of the book, the calculus of complex numbers will be built on the propeties that we develop in this chapter. 1.1 Definition and Algebraic Properties The complex numbers can be defined as pairs of real numbers, C = { ( x,y ) : x,y R } , 1
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CHAPTER 1. COMPLEX NUMBERS 2 equipped with the addition ( x,y ) + ( a,b ) = ( x + a,y + b ) and the multiplication ( x,y ) · ( a,b ) = ( xa - yb,xb + ya ) . One reason to believe that the definitions of these binary operations are “good” is that C is an extension of R , in the sense that the complex numbers of the form ( x, 0) behave just like real numbers; that is, ( x, 0) + ( y, 0) = ( x + y, 0) and ( x, 0) · ( y, 0) = ( x · y, 0). So we can think of the real numbers being embedded in C as those complex numbers whose second coordinate is zero. The following basic theorem states the algebraic structure that we established with our defini- tions. Its proof is straightforward but nevertheless a good exercise.
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Chapter1 - Chapter 1 Complex Numbers Die ganzen Zahlen hat...

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