Unit4_TheExecutiveBranch

Unit4_TheExecutiveBranch - 1 Unit 4 The Executive Branch...

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1 Unit 4: The Executive Branch The Scope and Limits of Executive Power Controversies Regarding the Executive Branch: Executive Privilege and Impeachments; Unitary Executive Theory President Harry Truman “Being a President is like riding a tiger. A man has to keep on riding or be swallowed." Expected Outcomes : To appreciate the process of becoming president; to understand the powers and constraints of the office; and to comprehend the logic and criticisms behind executive privilege and unitary executive theory. Unit 4 Overview Ironically, the United States was founded upon the rejection of one-person rule (the King of England), and yet Americans often expect so much of presidents, holding them accountable for the nation’s economic performance - when a presidents ability to influence the economy is extremely limited. The presidency of the United States combines various domestic and international responsibilities, and in the age of nuclear weapons the Oval Office of the White House office has been described as the most powerful office in the world, both in reality and symbolically. The president acts as the leader of the party, a chief legislator, a diplomat, a Commander-in-Chief and a crisis manager. In modern times, President Roosevelt best reflects the heightened profile of the presidency, as he led the nation through both the Great Depression and World War II. It is possible to view the entire history of the United States through the window of the White House. The kinds of presidents the US has experienced, with their personal and partisan orientations, have often reflected upon the country as a whole. Some presidential events – such as the assassination of John F. Kennedy – became a part of every Americans’ individual life story, and everyone who remembers that day also remembers exactly where he or she was when they learned of the assassination in Dallas.
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2 It is useful to divide up American history into dominant themes and to group presidents together who faced similar circumstances. It is important to know the succession of presidents since 1961, as well as their party affiliations ((D) for Democratic and (R) for Republican). Early Republic and the Formation of National Government 1789- 1829 George Washington John Adams Thomas Jefferson James Madison James Monroe John Quincy Adams Jacksonian Democracy and Westward Expansion 1829-1853 Andrew Jackson Martin Van Buren William Harrison John Tyler James Polk Zachary Taylor Millard Fillmore Sectional Conflict and Reconstruction 1853-1881 Franklin Pierce James Buchanan Abraham Lincoln Andrew Johnson Ulysses Grant Rutherford Hayes The Gilded Age, Industrialization and Urbanization 1881-1897 James Garfield Chester Arthur Grover Cleveland Benjamin Harrison Grover Cleveland The Progressive Era and Becoming a World Power 1897-1921 William McKinley
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3 Theodore Roosevelt William Taft Woodrow Wilson The Great Depression & World Conflict 1921-1961 Warren Harding Calvin Coolidge Herbert Hoover
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Unit4_TheExecutiveBranch - 1 Unit 4 The Executive Branch...

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