Strategic Marketing Final

Strategic Marketing Final - Strategic Analysis Eshon Howard...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Strategic Analysis Eshon Howard Bus 336 Jenna Soard 1
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Strategic Analysis Introduction It’s the new millennium and Microsoft is no longer the most relevant force in the software industry. The company has not been expanding into new markets and the company’s stock price is stagnant (Cravens, 2006). The challenges Microsoft faces are direr than at any time in the company’s history. Therefore, the information in this document will analyze Microsoft’s past, present, and make suggestions for improving performance in the future. Background Microsoft is one of the world’s most identifiable companies and brands. Microsoft is a behemoth is the computer software industry. The company offers a diverse array of products ranging from software, middleware, and even video gaming consoles. With an operating system market share of over 90%, Microsoft is the most dominant brand in the computer technology industry (N.A., 20011). Company History In the early 1970s, the computer industry was geared more toward the hardware component of computing. During this era PC software did not exist. It was then that Microsoft’s founders William Gates and Paul Allen embarked on a mission to make software the dominant force behind the software industry. By the 1990s, not only did software become the driving force behind the industry but, Microsoft became the world leader of the software industry. Eventually Microsoft grew to be valued at over $7 billion with a gross income of over $1 billion a month. By 1999 Microsoft boasted a workforce of more than 31,000 employees. The company’s revenue soared an average of 36% throughout the decade and Microsoft was one of the most widely held stocks on the market (Cravens, 2006). 2
Background image of page 2
Strategic Analysis In the 2000s the growth of Microsoft slowed down considerably to the point of the company only reporting single digit growth (Cravens, 2006). A portion of the blame for the decrease in growth was the onslaught of antitrust litigation brought forth by the United States Government. These lawsuits resulted in sanctions being placed on a key component of Microsoft’s strategic marketing initiatives: its bundling practices. To combat this decline, Microsoft appointed long-time employee Steve Ballmer to take over as Chief Executive Officer of the company, and gave him respective duties as business manager. Ballmer’s qualifications for the position were astronomical. He had held management positions in virtually every Microsoft subdivision including, operating systems development, operations, and sales support. Purpose of the Marketing Plan The objective of this document is to analyze the current state of Microsoft’s business activities. We will analyze the current marketing strategies to reveal inefficiencies and to weed out counterproductive methods in our management activities. The information in this essay can be utilized to fulfill Microsoft’s targeted projections. This departmental report should be included in the overall strategic plans of the company. This document will also outline
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 06/19/2011 for the course MKT 201 taught by Professor Jimmers during the Spring '11 term at Ashford University.

Page1 / 11

Strategic Marketing Final - Strategic Analysis Eshon Howard...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online