ch369_sp11_class_8_notes

ch369_sp11_class_8_notes - Clickerquestion...

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What type of interaction causes hemoglobin  polymerization and fiber formation ? A) van der Waals B) hydrophobic effect C) ionic interactions  A single amino acid change (Glu => Val) results in hemoglobin  fiber formation in red blood cells, distorting the cell shape. Clicker question.
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First topic:  “Cytoskeletal Proteins and Motor Proteins” (Chapter 5 of textbook) Cells contain a “ cytoskeleton ”,  formed by fibrous proteins. Cytoskeleton gives a cell shape,  and helps keeps things  organized. “Protein Function”
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We have recently looked at some “ globular proteins ” such as  myoglobin and hemoglobin. Next:  Describe some  “ Fibrous proteins ”. These globular proteins are roughly spherical in shape, with mostly  hydrophobic amino acids on the inside, hydrophilic on the outside. Fibrous proteins of the cytoskeleton:         .   Also, other fibrous proteins that are exterior to cells:                 collagen, keratin .
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The  cytoskeleton  in a typical eukaryotic cell contains several types  of fibers:     Microfilaments  (thin, about 70 Å diameter)     Intermediate filaments  (a bit thicker, 100 Å)     Microtubules  (thicker, about 240 Å diameter) These act as tracks for “motor proteins” which use chemical energy  (energy from converting ATP to ADP) to move molecules.
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The green thing is ATP bound  to the actin. Actin has about 375 a.a.  (medium sized protein). First describe  microfilaments . Microfilaments are made of a protein called  actin . actin monomer
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globular protein  (G-actin), and can also assemble into  microfilaments (F-actin). Microfilaments are dynamic:  They constantly shrink and grow by adding  or losing actin monomers from their ends. Microfilaments usually grow faster at their “+ end”.
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ch369_sp11_class_8_notes - Clickerquestion...

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