Exercise_Induced_Asthma - Exercise-Induced Asthma A...

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Exercise-Induced Asthma A Presentation by: Madison Ealand Matt Mayo Reese Ochoa Andrew Stalford Travis Vanover Lindsey Williams Ashley Yeh
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Overview Definitions/Differences Physiological Background Causes Effects on Performance Dangers of EIB Treatments Sport Studies Swimming o Case Study
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DEFINITION: xercise-induced asthma: a medical condition characterized by shortness of breath induced by sustained aerobic exercise narrowing of the airways and difficulty breathing that comes on five to 10 minutes after the beginning of exercise shares many features with other types of asthma, and responds to some typical asthma medications but does not appear to be caused by the same inflammatory reaction as the other types
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DIFFERENCES -A well conditioned person will usually only experience symptoms of EIA under vigorous activity or exercise. -Asthma is usually divided into 2 types: -Allergic (extrinsic) -Non-allergic (intrinsic) -Many similar symptoms (coughing, wheezing, chest tightness, rapid breathing, etc.) -EIA is non-allergic; which means that they are triggered by other factors such as anxiety, stress, exercise, or cold air, smoke, and other irritants. -In non-allergic asthma, the immune system is not involved in the reaction.
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Physiological Background of EIA There are two main hypotheses of the mechanistic pathways that cause exercise induced asthma. One hypothesis focuses on water loss due to exercise and the other hypothesis focuses on the postexertional rewarming of airways. These two theories are appropriately named: The water-loss hypothesis - the more accepted theory The postexertional airway-rewarming hypothesis
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The Water-Loss Hypothesis When exercising, people switch from nasal-breathing to mouth- breathing at a ventilation rate of 30-60 liters per minute, the new form of breathing decreases the airway humidity. The decreased airway humidity caused by increased ventilation creates evaporative water loss from the bronchial mucosa. This increased mucosal osmolarity has several consequences, including o an increase in bronchial blood flow producing edema o smooth muscle contraction producing further airway obstruction
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The Postexertional Airway-Rewarming Hypothesis
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This note was uploaded on 06/20/2011 for the course CHEM 369 taught by Professor Hoffman during the Spring '11 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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Exercise_Induced_Asthma - Exercise-Induced Asthma A...

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